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Classification and Reclassification

Class standards are written in a broad and general manner, making it difficult to apply to concrete working situations. You can learn how your campus classifiers interpret the language of the standards by paying attention to your campus job postings, and the results of classification reviews. Read the standards in their entirety.

Easy Steps to Writing Reclass Documents

Collect the following resources to help you: your campus position description form, your latest official position description (if you don’t have one, ask HR), the classification standards for your current classification and the one to which you aspire to campus job postings, the position description of another employee in the classification you are aiming for, the Know Your Rights flyer on Reclassification and In Class Progression, verb lists and other practical aids for reclassification.

www.csueu.org/cqs

Write down everything that you do in no particular order, over a few weeks’ time.

Think of about 3-4 broad categories into which all the details can be divided such as budget, academic personnel, student services, chair support, special events, etc. Assign percentages of time to the large categories, not to individual duties.

The verbs you use are critical. They describe the level at which you work as well as your actual duties. Use action verbs like coordinate, organize, manage, advise, interpret, research, analyze, initiate, oversee, decide, recommend, create, design, edit, program, etc. Write in complete sentences and be consistent with your verb tenses and persons.

Express your overall responsibilities at their highest level. Then describe what you do to carry out those responsibilities, what tools you use, and state the end result desired. If you type travel claim forms it is probably because you are responsible for reporting all travel in your office, and you are also interpreting and enforcing campus and department travel policies, and tracking expenditures. The following is an example: Incumbent is responsible for the reporting of all travel in the History Department for 15 faculty. Incumbent completes all travel claim forms electronically and submits them to accounting with the appropriate backup, monitors and tracks the expenditures in PeopleSoft for accuracy, and interprets and applies department and university travel policies and procedures, in order to ensure compliance with all regulations, and to make sure that the Department stays within budget.

Write a draft and show it to a friend. Better yet, form a small group of people with the same classification and meet regularly, setting specific goals and deadlines until you are finished. Always ask someone to proof your work. Your position description becomes official after it is signed by your supervisor and dean/director, and filed in Human Resources.

Skills, Knowledge and Ability

The following are some examples of possible SKA’s, but by no means exhaust the many different skills, knowledge and abilities that employees use. Be very specific to your own work, citing specific situations in which you use them.

SKILLS = learned technical expertise
KNOWLEGE = learned information
ABILITY =   present competence

Words that are used to denote the amount or level of SKA:

Independently
Effectively
Demonstrated ability
Proficient
At an advanced level
Working knowledge
Thorough knowledge
Comprehensive and detailed knowledge 

Examples:

Knowledge of federal/state, university/college/department regulations, policies, procedures, codes, practices, laws with the ability to independently interpret, communicate and apply. (Give specific examples.)

Ability to establish multiple priorities and conceive and manage own projects.

Skill in identifying, investigating and analyzing problems.

Ability to make independent decisions and exercise sound judgment.

Ability to analyze data and make accurate projections.

Ability to effectively adapt to changing policies, procedures and technology.

Knowledge of fiscal management principles and basic bookkeeping skills.

Ability to maintain confidentiality.

Supervisory skills: ability to recruit, hire, train, evaluate, establish priorities and motivate.

Ability to plan, organize, and coordinate day-to-day and long range activities.

Skill in investigating and analyzing problems, and in the collection and evaluation of data to develop valid conclusions and recommendations.

Ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships.

Ability to present ideas and concepts effectively in written or presentation format and use persuasion and facilitation skills to gain consensus.

Ability to use negotiation and persuasion skills to achieve results and expedite projects.

Ability to research, write and present reports.

Ability to communicate effectively, orally, in writing and electronically with faculty, staff, students and the general public.

Ability to develop and maintain productive relationships with a diverse faculty, staff, and student population, and to respond appropriately, especially to conflicts or problems.

Ability to self motivate to continue to improve knowledge and skills by attending workshops and classes.

Ability to effectively handle interpersonal interactions at all levels and to respond appropriately in sensitive interpersonal situations.

State all specific SKA’s regarding computer software and hardware and systems, mechanical tools, directories, handbooks, manuals, etc. that you use in your job.

Classification vs. ICP

The Administrative Support Example

The Administrative Support Series contains two distinct classifications with two skill levels each.

1. Administrative Support Assistant

Administrative Support Assistant I
Administrative Support Assistant II

2. Administrative Support Coordinator

Administrative Coordinator I
Administrative Coordinator II 

RECLASSIFICATION - To move from an Assistant to a Coordinator is a Reclassification.

IN CLASS PROGRESSION - To move from an Assistant I (Coordinator I) to an Assistant II (Coordinator II) is an In Class Progression.

A SEPARATE CLASSIFICATION-Analyst/Specialist is a distinct classification not part of the Admin. Support series. It has three skill levels of its own.

Skill level I - non exempt
Skill level II – exempt I
Skill level III – exempt II

Verbs Describing Tasks

Here is a list of verbs that other people have used in describing job tasks. When possible, try to avoid verbs that can be interpreted in many different ways. Select concrete, definitive verbs that best describe the task.

ABSTRACTS
ADJUSTS
ADMINISTERS
ADMITS
ADVISES
ANALYZES
ANESTHETIZES
ANSWERS
ASSESSES
ASSIGNS
ATTENDS
AUDITS
BATHES
BILLS
CALCULATES
CALIBRATES
CHARGES
CHARTS
CHASES
CHECKS
CLASSIFIES
CLEANS
CLIMBS
COLLECTS
COMMUNICATES
COMPILES
COMPOSES
COMPUTES
CONDUCTS
CONSULTS
COORDINATES
COPIES
COUNSELS
COUNTS
DELIVERS
DEMONSTRATES
DESIGNS
DETAINS
DETERMINES
DEVELOPS
DICTATES
DIGS
DISCHARGES
DISCUSSES
DISPENSES

DISPOSES
DISSEMINATES
DRAWS
DUPLICATES
ENFORCES
ESCORTS
ESTABLISHES
EVALUATES
EXAMINES
EXCHANGES
EXPLAINS
FILES
GATHERS
GENERATES
GUARDS
HAULS
IDENTIFIES
IMPLEMENTS
INJECTS
INQUIRES
INSPECTS
INSTRUCTS
INTERPRETS INTERVIEWS
INVESTIGATES
ISSUES
LABELS
LISTS
LISTENS TO
LOCATES
LOCKS
MANAGES
MANIPULATES
MEASURES
MEETS WITH
MODIFIES
MONITORS
NEGOTIATES
NOTES
OBSERVES
OBTAINS
OPERATES
ORDERS
ORGANIZES
PACKAGES

PACKAGES
PATROLS
PICKS UP
PLANS
PROGRAMS
PUSHES
QUESTIONS
READS
RECOMMENDS
RECONCILES
RECRUITS
REGISTERS
REHABILITATES REPAIRS
REPORTS
REPRIMANDS
REQUESTS
RESEARCHERS
REVIEWS
SCHEDULES
SEARCHES
SEEKS
SELECTS
SERVICES
SKETCHES
SORTS
STAMPS
STERILIZES
STUDIES
SUBMITS
SURVEYS
TELEPHONES
TESTS
TRAINS
TRANSCRIBES
TRANSLATES
TRANSPORTS
TRAVELS
TREATS
TRIMS
TYPES
UPDATES
VERIFIES
VISITS
WORD PROCESSES
WRITE

Action Verbs

Use these verbs when writing position descriptions and other reclass documents.

Management Skills

Administered
Analyzed
Assigned
Contracted
Controlled
Coordinated
Delegated
Hired
Developed
Directed
Evaluated
Executed
Implemented
Initiated
Organized
Performed
Planned
Prioritized
Produced
Recommended
Reviewed
Scheduled
Supervised
Terminated

Communication Skills

Arbitrated
Arranged
Created
Developed
Directed
Enlisted
Helped
Influenced
Interpreted
Led
Manipulated
Mediated
Merged
Motivated
Negotiated
Obtained
Persuaded
Read
Reasoned
Reconciled
Recruited
Sold
Spoke
Wrote

Research Skills

Clarified
Collected
Compiled
Critiqued
Decided
Diagnosed
Evaluated
Examined
Extrapolated
Gathered
Inspected
Interpreted
Interviewed
Investigated
Observed
Organized
Perceived
Problems
Recognized
Reviewed
Studied
Surveyed
Synthesized
Wrote

Detail Skills

Approved
Arranged
Classified
Collated
Collected
Compared
Compiled
Dispatched
Enforced
Executed
Facilitated
Followed
Implemented
Inspected
Judged
Met deadlines
Operated
Organized
Processed
Purchased
Recorded
Responded
Retained
Retrieved
Systematized
Tabulated
Through
Validated

Teaching Skills

Adapted
Adopted
Advised
Briefed
Clarified
Coached
Communicated
Coordinated
Counseled
Decided
Developed
Enabled
Encouraged
Enlightened
Explained
Facilitated
Guided
Influence
Informed
Initiated
Instructed
Instructed
Invented
Persuaded
Stimulated
Valued

Creative Skills

Abstracted
Acted
Conceptualized
Created
Designed
Developed
Developed
Directed
Discriminated
Fashioned
Generated
Imagined
Innovated
Integrated
Memorized
Painted
Perceived
Performed
Planned
Sensitivity
Shaped
Shared
Synthesized
Visualized
Wrote

Financial Skills

Administered
Allocated
Analyzed
Audited
Budgeted
Calculated
Computed
Detailed
Developed
Increased speed
Keeping
Maintained accuracy
Managed
Performed Accounting
Performed bookkeeping
Performed recordkeepinh
Planned
Prepared
Researched
Solved

Manual Skills

Assembled
Bent
Bound
Built
Controlled
Cut
Drilled
Drove
Fed
Handled
Lifted
Moved
Operated
Performed
Pulled
Punched
Set up
Shipped
Tended

Helping Skills

Adjusted
Advised
Approach
Attended
Cared
Developed
Directed
Guided
Led
Listened
Mentored
Perceived
Referred
Related
Rendered
Sensitivity
Serviced
Spoke
Used Teamwork

Position Descriptions

Every CSU bargaining unit employee has the right to a Position Description. Under the CSEA contract, new employees should be given a position description within one week of hire and current employees must receive a copy within forty-five days of their request.

Position Description forms may vary from campus to campus, but all contain basic information about your work:

Your name and classification, time base and working title.

Your immediate supervisor.

The purpose of the position in the department.

Your supervision of others (if applicable).

The major responsibilities, usually with some percentage of time for each duty.

Any specialized requirements, such as licenses, certificates, etc.

Your Position Description is important for several reasons:

It defines your normal duties and is the basis for your classification (or later reclassification).

It is the basis for performance evaluation (including probationary reviews).

It defines your reporting relationships (who can and cannot give you orders).

It can affect any disciplinary action on failure to perform normal and reasonable duties.

The CSEA contract requires that your Position Description be an accurate reflection of your assigned duties. Article 17 of the contract covers Position Descriptions and other aspects of assignment (such as the requirement that there be a single appropriate administrator to give you instructions).

Normally, the Position Description includes signature lines for you and your supervisor. You must make sure that the Position Description is accurate to protect your job interests. Here are some common problems associated with Position Descriptions:

Duties: Not all duties are listed (sometimes allowing out-of-class work to go unnoticed). Sometimes duties are listed that are not really being performed, which can be a problem later when the supervisor (or a new one) expects them to be performed. The sum total of the duties should be able to fit in a normal work day (eight hours for FLSA non-exempt, less defined but reasonable for FLSA exempt).

Supervision: The person listed is not the actual supervisor because someone further down the line is giving direction. In academic settings, the Dean may be listed while work comes from the Department Chair (or even directly from faculty). If supervision is not clear, then conflicting and overwhelming work demands can be made.

Reassignment

Employees may be reassigned from their original position. This may be on a temporary or permanent basis. In either case, management is required to provide notice and record the change in duties. You should receive a new Position Description for either reassignment (although typically management only provides it for permanent reassignment).

It is important to keep your Position Description up-to-date. Duties can shift over time and changes in department staffing can increase job responsibilities and workload. Without an accurate Position Description, you can lose out on opportunities for reclassification, out-of-class pay or protect yourself against unreasonable work expectations.

Tips for Employees

Make sure you have a copy of your Position Description.

Review it to make sure it is accurate.

If your duties change, ask your supervisor to update your Position Description.

If you are refused a Position Description or an update, talk to a CSEA steward about requiring compliance with the CSEA contract.

CSEA Contract Provisions

17.1 Written notice of permanent reassignment seven days prior to change.

17.2 President may reassign employee for a limited period of time.

17.3 Employees are paid for out-of-class reassignments.

17.4 Reassignments are recorded.

17.5 Employees have a right to return to their permanent assignment.

17.6 Employees have a right to know who is the supervisor and to get written clarifications of instructions.

17.7 Employees have a right to a Position Description and it must be accurate.

17.8 Employees have right to meet with the supervisor to discuss the Position Description and duties.

Classification and Reclassification Documents